Case Study

Unlocking Prosperity In The Horn Of Africa

Hargeisa Bypass

UNLOCKING PROSPERITY IN THE HORN OF AFRICA

Case Study Summary The UK is supporting development of the ‘Berbera Corridor,’ between Berbera Port in Somaliland to the Ethiopian border at Tog Wajaale. The Unlocking Prosperity in the Horn of Africa programme aims to improve transport infrastructure, trade efficiency, local economic development and increase market access. When fully operational, a competitive Berbera Corridor will support prosperity and poverty reduction in Somaliland, Ethiopia and the wider Horn of Africa region.
Sector
           Transport
Key Topics
  • Economic development
  • Poverty reduction
Project Owner UK Aid, implemented by TradeMark Africa
Project Start/Completion Nov 2020 – Ongoing
Location Somaliland
Community Impacted Urban
Vulnerable Groups Impacted Women and girls, Youth, Elderly people, Indigenous and traditional communities, Internally displaced people
Climate Hazards Mitigated Water stress, Extreme wind
Case Study Provided by
UKaid

Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office

The UK is supporting development of the ‘Berbera Corridor,’ between Berbera Port in Somaliland to the Ethiopian border at Tog Wajaale. The Unlocking Prosperity in the Horn of Africa programme aims to improve transport infrastructure, trade efficiency, local economic development and increase market access. When fully operational, a competitive Berbera Corridor will support prosperity and poverty reduction in Somaliland, Ethiopia and the wider Horn of Africa region.

About the Project

Upgrading critical road infrastructure along the Berbera Corridor is a catalyst for economic transformation in the Horn of Africa. This programme supports construction of the 22.5km climate- resilient Hargeisa Bypass, a critical component of the Berbera Corridor, aiming to decongest traffic through Somaliland’s capital city and reduce transportation time and costs.

Road assets are vulnerable to climate stressors such as higher temperatures, increased precipitation, or flooding. This programme took a systemic approach to embedding climate resilience through 1) ‘zooming in’ on the bypass road infrastructure future climate risks and vulnerabilities; and 2) ‘zooming out’ on the ecosystem and communities living along the Berbera Corridor future climate risks and vulnerabilities. A climate risk and resilience matrix, the first of its kind for regional infrastructure in the Horn, provided the following infrastructure recommendations, which were implemented during construction:

  • Flood estimates uplifted by 20% for bridge and culverts
  • Changes in design and location of 210m Wadi

bridge to address vulnerabilities identified

  • Increase in number of culverts from 12 to 24
  • 80% of workforce from

Longer-term resilience recommendations along the corridor included enhancing food storage trade for perishable products, improving access to water points and veterinary services for livestock trade, and improving storage and distribution for the fisheries sector.

Achieved Outcomes

 When construction is completed, this programme will have delivered the longest bridge in Somaliland, facilitated faster movement of emergency humanitarian goods to vulnerable communities in the region and reduced time and cost of freight along the Berbera Corridor. Stimulating business growth and connectivity encourages regional prosperity, stability and poverty reduction.

Improvements in transport infrastructure, trade arrangements and linkages with local economies will produce a more efficient, investable, and inclusive Berbera corridor with positive long-term impacts on economic growth, stability and poverty reduction.

Number of vulnerable people made more resilience by this project

~1,200,000

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