Case Study

Rebuilding Infrastructure In Peru

Case Study Summary In 2017, the El Niño climate cycle hit Peru, causing the loss of lives and more than a billion dollars of damage to homes, businesses, public facilities and critical infrastructure. In 2018-19 the Peru Government established the Autoridad Para la Reconstrucción Con Cambios (ARCC, Authority for the Reconstruction with Changes) to rebuild destroyed or damaged infrastructure and increase national resilience, while transforming the way the country delivers major capital programmes.
Sector
WATER
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Key Topics •       Collaboration
•       Early Warning System
•       Healthcare
•       Education
•       Carbon sequestration
•       Ecological uplift
Project Owner Authority for Reconstruction with Changes (ARCC)
Project Start/Completion July 2020 – Ongoing
Location Peru
Community Impacted Rural, Coastal
Vulnerable Groups Impacted Women and girls, Youth, Elderly people, People of color, Indigenous and traditional communities, Internally displaced people (IDPs)
Climate Hazards Mitigated Water stress, Hurricanes/cyclones, Extreme wind
Case Study Provided by ARUP Logo

In 2017, the El Niño climate cycle hit Peru, causing the loss of lives and more than a billion dollars of damage to homes, businesses, public facilities and critical infrastructure. In 2018-19 the Peru Government established the Autoridad Para la Reconstrucción Con Cambios (ARCC, Authority for the Reconstruction with Changes) to rebuild destroyed or damaged infrastructure and increase national resilience, while transforming the way the country delivers major capital programmes.

About the Project

Peru sought international support to deliver an integrated reconstruction ‘with changes’ programme and the UK was appointed as preferred partner. The UK and Peru Governments then formed a two-year Government-to-Government agreement, through which the ARCC appointed Arup, Mace, and Gleeds as a joint UK Delivery Team (UKDT) embedded within the ARCC to accelerate and assure the delivery of critical infrastructure totalling 119 projects, which were valued at £1.7 billion across 13 regions of Peru. The agreement is in the process of being extended to the end of 2023.

Starting in July 2020, the UKDT was tasked with putting systems, processes and practices in place to accelerate the delivery of 74 schools and 15 healthcare facilities in the areas hardest hit, as well as flood protection on 17 river basins and 5 gullies, and drainage systems for 7 cities. Additionally, following a UKDT review, the ARCC is set to invest in a national integrated Early Warning System that will better equip and prepare 16 million people living in high-risk areas to respond to natural disasters. The system will also include new emergency command centres, new telecommunications infrastructure and a new siren system.

The task required a systemic change in Peru’s public sector through the proactive transfer of specialist knowledge, establishing a transferable portfolio management office function and assuring the design, delivery and operation of resilient facilities and infrastructure to international standards.

Intended Outcomes

The project has been founded on the principles of community benefit. The infrastructure provided will be resilient for current and future generations and will empower communities to adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Early Warning System is an integrated communication system to help communities prepare for hazardous climate-related events.

Additionally:

  • 74 schools are being built or retrofitted
  • 47,000 school places will be available in the first tranche of schools
  • 8 regions will benefit from schools
  • 15 healthcare facilities will provide services to nearly 5 million residents of Peru
  • There will be flood defence improvements to 17 river basins, 5 gullies and 7 city drainages supported by a national Early Warning System

How has carbon mitigation been integrated?

The planting of 56 million trees and seedlings as part of natural flood defences will capture an estimated 220,000 tonnes of carbon per year. This carbon capture will amount to 0.12% of Peru’s national target emissions in 2030 while improving community resilience to floods and creating accessible green spaces for farming, the public and wildlife.

Enhancing resilience of natural systems

Millions of trees will be planted and a variety of terracing, earthworks and soil conservation techniques will cover 51,000 hectares to reduce the risk of flooding across 17 river basins. This ecological approach will avoid expensive construction while capturing carbon and creating new green and biodiverse spaces for improved agricultural practices and increased community resilience to climate change.

Find out more


Read more case studies...

Filter by